native bridge to pulsechain

Native Bridge

Move Capital Seamlessly Between PulseChain and Ethereum

Why use our Native Bridge to PulseChain?

Users with a Coast Digital Account can seamlessly bridge economic value between Ethereum and PulseChain. In fact, Coast provides the fastest and cheapest (0.10%) bridging currently available for PulseChain users.

ETH to PLS: Send USDC to your Digital Account and mint $CST on PulseChain
PLS to ETH: Burn $CST and your Digital Account is issued $USDC on Ethereum 

Key Benefits of bridging to PulseChain using Coast

  • No Gas Fees on the Ethereum side
  • Fixed 0.10% swap fee when going from $USD to USDC on Ethereum
  • Free to mint $CST on PulseChain
  • Free faucet to receive $PLS on PulseChain
  • Round trip can be completed in ~2mins
  • No waiting for bridge confirmations or congestion to clear
  • Coast takes NO FEES for any bridge related functions – we strictly charge for on ramp and off ramp

What's Next?

"Blockchain bridges are the architects of unity in the diverse world of cryptocurrencies. They interlink isolated islands of innovation, fueling seamless interaction, and fostering a global network of possibilities in the decentralized world."

Blockchain Bridges FAQ

The most commonly asked questions about blockchain bridges. Answered by the Coast team.

A blockchain bridge provides a connection that allows for the transfer of tokens and/or data between two different blockchain networks. This connection is crucial in the growing ecosystem of various blockchains, each with their unique properties, as it supports interoperability between these different networks. 

Without these bridges, blockchains operate as isolated islands, and assets on one blockchain cannot interact or be moved to another. Blockchain bridges aim to solve this problem, allowing for a variety of new applications, including cross-chain transfers, atomic swaps, and more complex multi-step smart contract interactions across different blockchains.

Blockchain bridges work by connecting two separate blockchain networks, allowing tokens and other data to be transferred between these networks. There are different ways to create a blockchain bridge, but they generally involve locking or minting and burning tokens to maintain a consistent total supply across both networks. Here’s a simplified explanation:

Locking and Minting: When you want to move tokens from Blockchain A to Blockchain B, the bridge contract will often lock the original tokens on Blockchain A. It will then mint an equivalent amount of tokens on Blockchain B. These new tokens are a representation of the original tokens but exist on Blockchain B.

Burning and Unlocking: When you want to move your tokens back to Blockchain A, the bridge contract will burn the tokens on Blockchain B, effectively destroying them. It then unlocks the equivalent amount of tokens on Blockchain A.

This process ensures that the total supply of the token remains the same, even as it moves between different blockchains.

There are several types of blockchain bridges, including federated bridges, hash time-locked contracts (HTLCs), and sidechains or relay chains. The exact mechanism of each type varies, but they all serve the same purpose: to allow the movement of tokens and data between different blockchains.

There are several types of blockchain bridges that have been developed to address the challenge of interoperability between different blockchains. Here are some examples:

Ethereum-Polygon Bridge: This is a set of bridges that allow for assets to be moved between the Ethereum blockchain and the Polygon sidechain. Polygon was previously known as Matic Network.

Binance Bridge: Binance Bridge is a service provided by Binance that allows users to move their tokens between Binance Smart Chain and other networks. The service supports a wide range of tokens and blockchains.

Wanchain: Wanchain aims to build a super financial market by connecting distinct digital assets. Its live cross-blockchain solution is powered by the latest distributed ledger technology.

Near Rainbow Bridge: This is a trustless bridge between NEAR and Ethereum blockchains. It allows developers to utilize Ethereum assets and smart contracts on the scalable NEAR platform.

Cosmos Peg Zone: Cosmos aims to create an “Internet of Blockchains,” and its Peg Zone concept is a type of blockchain that is specifically designed to connect different chains together.

Polkadot: Polkadot is a multi-chain platform, where multiple chains, or “parachains,” connect to and are secured by a central Relay Chain. This enables interoperability between a wide variety of chains.

Wrapped Bitcoin (WBTC): Although not a bridge in the strict sense, Wrapped Bitcoin (WBTC) is a token on the Ethereum blockchain that represents Bitcoin. Each WBTC is backed 1:1 with Bitcoin, and it’s a good example of how assets can be represented and used across different blockchains.

Blockchain bridges are vital for several reasons, particularly as the blockchain space continues to grow and evolve:

Interoperability: There are many different blockchains, each with its unique features and capabilities. Blockchain bridges allow these various networks to interact and communicate with each other, leading to a more interconnected and powerful ecosystem.

Asset Transfer: One of the most common uses of blockchain bridges is to transfer assets between different blockchains. For example, a bridge could allow a token on the Ethereum network to be moved to the Binance Smart Chain, enabling it to be used in that ecosystem.

Enhanced Functionality: Blockchain bridges can allow complex multi-step operations that involve more than one blockchain. This opens up a lot of potential for developers to create applications that leverage the best features of different blockchains.

Increased Liquidity: By enabling assets to move freely between different blockchains, bridges can help increase the overall liquidity in the crypto market. This is particularly important for decentralized exchanges and other DeFi applications.

Cost Efficiency: Transferring assets or executing smart contracts on some blockchains can be costly due to high gas fees. A bridge to a more cost-efficient blockchain can provide users with cheaper alternatives for transactions and contract interactions.

Not all cryptocurrencies can be transferred using blockchain bridges. Bridges typically support a limited number of assets, and the specific assets that are supported can vary from bridge to bridge. For example, the Wormhole bridge supports the transfer of Bitcoin, Ethereum, and USDC between the Ethereum and Solana blockchains, while the Allbridge bridge supports the transfer of over 100 different cryptocurrencies between a variety of blockchains. 

If you want to transfer a cryptocurrency that is not supported by a bridge, you will need to find a different way to do so. One option is to sell the cryptocurrency for a different cryptocurrency that is supported by a bridge, and then use the bridge to transfer the new cryptocurrency to the desired blockchain. Another option is to use a centralized exchange that supports both the source and destination blockchains.

There are a number of risks involved in using blockchain bridges. These risks include:

Smart contract risk: Blockchain bridges are typically built on smart contracts, which are pieces of code that run on the blockchain. If there is a bug in a smart contract, it could be exploited by hackers to steal funds.

Human error risk: Users can also make mistakes when using blockchain bridges. For example, they could send the wrong tokens to the wrong address, or they could forget their private keys.

Underlying blockchain risk: The underlying blockchain that a bridge is built on could also be hacked or compromised. If this happens, it could lead to the loss of funds that are held on the bridge.

Centralization risk: Some blockchain bridges are centralized, meaning that they are controlled by a single entity. This could pose a risk to users if the entity were to become hacked or if it were to decide to freeze or confiscate funds.

Liquidity risk: Some blockchain bridges may have low liquidity, meaning that it may be difficult to buy or sell assets on the bridge. This could make it difficult to get your funds out of the bridge if you need to.

It is important to be aware of these risks before using a blockchain bridge. If you are not comfortable with the risks, you should consider using a different method to transfer your funds.

No, transactions through blockchain bridges are not instant. The time it takes for a transaction to be processed through a blockchain bridge can vary depending on the bridge, the blockchains involved, and the amount of traffic on the network. In general, transactions through blockchain bridges can take anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes to be processed.

There are a few reasons why transactions through blockchain bridges are not instant. First, blockchain bridges typically use smart contracts to facilitate the transfer of assets between blockchains. Smart contracts are pieces of code that run on the blockchain, and they can take some time to execute. Second, blockchain bridges often have to coordinate with multiple blockchains, which can add to the processing time. Finally, the amount of traffic on the network can also affect the processing time of transactions through blockchain bridges.

If you need to make a quick transfer of assets between blockchains, you may want to consider using a centralized exchange. Centralized exchanges typically offer faster transfer times than blockchain bridges. However, it is important to note that centralized exchanges are more susceptible to hacks and other security risks. Here are some of the factors that can affect the processing time of a transaction through a bridge:

The type of bridge: There are two main types of blockchain bridges: centralized bridges and decentralized bridges. Centralized bridges are typically faster than decentralized bridges, but they are also more susceptible to hacks and other security risks. Decentralized bridges are more secure, but they can take longer to process transactions.

The blockchains involved: The processing time of a transaction through a blockchain bridge can also be affected by the blockchains involved. Some blockchains, such as Ethereum, are more congested than others. This can lead to longer processing times.

The amount of traffic on the network: The amount of traffic on the network can also affect the processing time of a transaction through a blockchain bridge. When there is a lot of traffic on the network, it can take longer for transactions to be processed.

Yes, it typically costs something to use a blockchain bridge. The cost of using a blockchain bridge can vary depending on the bridge, the blockchains involved, and the amount of traffic on the network. In general, the cost of using a blockchain bridge can range from a few cents to a few dollars.

There are a few reasons why blockchain bridges cost money. First, blockchain bridges typically use smart contracts to facilitate the transfer of assets between blockchains. Smart contracts are pieces of code that run on the blockchain, and they require gas to be executed. Second, blockchain bridges often have to coordinate with multiple blockchains, which can add to the cost. Finally, the amount of traffic on the network can also affect the cost of using a blockchain bridge. When there is a lot of traffic on the network, the cost of gas can increase.

If you are looking for a way to transfer assets between blockchains without paying any fees, you may want to consider using a decentralized exchange (DEX). DEXs are peer-to-peer exchanges that allow users to trade directly with each other without the need for a third party. However, it is important to note that DEXs can be more susceptible to hacks and other security risks than centralized exchanges.

Here are some of the factors that can affect the cost of using a blockchain bridge:

The type of bridge: There are two main types of blockchain bridges: centralized bridges and decentralized bridges. Centralized bridges are typically more expensive than decentralized bridges.

The blockchains involved: The cost of using a blockchain bridge can also be affected by the blockchains involved. Some blockchains, such as Ethereum, have higher gas fees than others.

The amount of traffic on the network: The amount of traffic on the network can also affect the cost of using a blockchain bridge. When there is a lot of traffic on the network, the cost of gas can increase.

When you use a blockchain bridge, your tokens are essentially locked on the source blockchain and minted on the destination blockchain. This means that you will no longer be able to see your tokens on the source blockchain, but you will be able to see them on the destination blockchain. 

The exact process of how this happens varies depending on the bridge you are using. However, most bridges use a process called “wrapping” to create the equivalent tokens on the destination blockchain. Wrapping essentially means that the bridge creates a new token that is backed by your original tokens. This new token is then minted on the destination blockchain and can be used there.

When you want to move your tokens back to the source blockchain, you will need to “unwrap” them. This process is essentially the reverse of wrapping. The bridge will burn the tokens on the destination blockchain and release your original tokens back to you on the source blockchain.

Blockchain bridges are not without risks. There is always the possibility that a bridge could be hacked or that the underlying technology could be compromised. As a result, it is important to only use bridges that you trust and to only transfer assets that you are comfortable losing.